End Doesn't Justify the Means in Anti-Terrorism Struggle, Says Nuncio

Papal Aide in Bulgaria Addresses European Ministers of Justice

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SOFIA, Bulgaria, OCT. 17, 2003 (Zenit.org).- The scourge of terrorism must be addressed by respecting human rights and analyzing the problem at all levels, not just the juridical, says the Holy See.



This position was expressed by Archbishop Giuseppe Leanza, who headed the Holy See's delegation to the 25th Conference of European Ministers of Justice, organized this week by the Council of Europe in Sofia, Vatican Radio reported.

Archbishop Leanza, apostolic nuncio in Bulgaria, emphasized that to heal the wound opened by terrorism, there must be international cooperation in addressing the problems at more levels. He also expressed satisfaction with the commitment of member countries of the Council of Europe against all forms of terrorism.

It is a sign that the Old World "is not resigned to the blackmail of an unjustifiable and unacceptable violence," he said.

The archbishop also stressed that in repressing terrorism there must be "total respect of international norms in the area of human rights."

In this connection, he explained that the end never justifies the means, as the "negation of this principle would result in an unbearable attack on human dignity."

Moreover, according to the Vatican diplomat, "action in the juridical realm is far from exhausting the necessary measures to combat terrorism."

If it is to be truly effective, the struggle against this phenomenon requires "appropriate measures in the pedagogical realm, oriented to promoting education inspired by respect for human life in every circumstance," he said.

There must be a conviction, he added, "that the unity of the human family is a reality that is stronger than contingent divisions which separate men and peoples."

Referring to the Pope's words on the matter, he pointed out the need for commitment "in the political, diplomatic and economic realm to resolve with courage and determination the situations of oppression and marginalization that might be at the origin" of terrorism.

In this context, religions have "an irreplaceable role which merits support," Archbishop Leanza concluded.