Medical Experts Approve Miracle Attributed to Fulton Sheen's Prayers

Board of Theologians Will Now Review Case in Next Step of Canonization Process

Washington, D.C., (Zenit.org) | 2616 hits

The seven-member board of medical experts that advises the Congregation for Saints' Causes unanimously recognized as miraculous the healing of a stillborn baby, attributed to the intercession of Venerable Fulton Sheen.

Bishop Daniel Jenky of Peoria, Illinois,  who is president of the Archbishop Fulton Sheen Foundation, received word early today about the medical experts' approval.

The case involved a still born baby born in September 2010.  For over an hour the child demonstrated no signs of life as medical professionals attempted every possible life saving procedure, while the child's parents and loved ones began immediately to seek the intercession of Fulton Sheen.   

After 61 minutes the baby was restored to full life and made a full recovery.  The child, now three years old, continues in good health. 

Today's decision affirms that the team of Vatican medical experts can find no natural explanation for the child's healing. 

The case will next be reviewed by a board of theologians. With their approval the case could move on to the cardinals and bishops who advise the Pope on these matters. Finally, the miracle would be presented to Pope Francis who would then officially affirm that God performed a miracle through the intercession of Fulton Sheen. 

There is no timeline as to when these next steps might  move forward. 

"Today is a significant step in the Cause for the Beatification and Canonization of our beloved Fulton Sheen, a priest of Peoria and a Son of the Heartland who went on to change the world.  There are many more steps ahead and more prayers are needed.  But today is a good reason to rejoice," commented Bishop Jenky. 

Fulton Sheen was born May 8, 1895, in El Paso, Illinois, outside of Peoria.  His family moved to Peoria so that Fulton and his brothers could attend Catholic school.  He grew up in the parish of the Cathedral of St. Mary where he was an altar server and later ordained a priest of the Diocese of Peoria.  After advanced studies and service as a parish priest in the city of Peoria, Fulton Sheen was a professor of philosophy and religion at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. 

In the 1930s he became a popular radio personality and later a TV pioneer.  His weekly TV program, "Life is Worth Living" eventually reached 30 million viewers and won an Emmy award for outstanding TV program. 

From 1950-1966, Bishop Sheen was the national director of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith in the United States, the Church's primary missionary apostolate.  In 1966, he was named Bishop of Rochester of New York where he served until his retirement in 1969, when he was named honorary Archbishop by Pope Paul VI.  Fulton Sheen died at the entrance to his private chapel in his New York City apartment on December 9, 1979.