Mexican Church Calls For Stricter Drug Laws

Archdiocesan Editorial Underlines "The Real Battle"

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MEXICO CITY, MARCH 17, 2009 (Zenit.org).- An editorial from a Mexican archdiocesan paper is accusing the country's political parties of blocking stricter laws against organized crime and drug trafficking.



The article appeared in Sunday's edition of Desde la Fe [from the faith], the paper of the Archdiocese of Mexico City, headed by Cardinal Norberto Rivera Carrera.

The editorial highlights the lack of will on the part of some political parties to approve laws for the extinction of the drug and narcotics dominion. It appeals to the faithful to keep in mind, in the upcoming July 5 elections, which political forces "refuse to eradicate the cancer of drugs and the spread of violence."
 
On July 5, "intermediary elections" will be held in Mexico, which will renew the Chamber of Deputies at the federal level. Elections will also replace some local congresses and six governors of the country.
 
Drug trafficking in Mexico claims an average of 20 victims every day in the struggle to control the public squares of a country that has changed from being a highway for drugs to a consumer.
 
The editorial, titled "The Real Battle," notes that "political groups that act in Congress point to their counterparts in the Institutional Revolutionary Party as the obstacle to take firmer steps in the battle against the drug cartels."
 
The publication continued: "Is there economic interest or political paltriness behind this? In either case, the answer alarms us."

The paper has traditionally taken a stance against the political deals carried out by Mexican parties that seek power for the sake of power.
 
In a criticism of the revolutionary party, which governed Mexico from 1929 until the year 2000, the paper emphasized that this political party is responsible for the increase in drug trafficking in the country, noting the years it was in government, and that it "suspiciously, now refuses to take more drastic measures."

The editorial asserted that there is a "representative political party that is already rubbing its hands [in the hope of returning] to power in the near future." This party, it continued, has "allowed the growth of this social cancer."
 
It added, "Society must be very attentive to the battle our country is engaged in against drug trafficking, to support or punish the parties that refuse to eradicate the cancer of drugs and the spread of violence."
 
The upcoming vote, it says, "is the only control and break that Mexicans have over political parties. It must be used well to favor the well-being of future generations and of the country in general, and not an ideology."